Labor & Economic News Blog


Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Raise the minimum wage, but don't forget about the cost of housing

Raise the minimum wage, but don't forget about the cost of housing

A worker would have to earn $33 an hour to afford the average apartment, KPCC reported this year. The state minimum wage of $9 an hour doesn’t have the same buying power in Los Angeles that it does in Bakersfield or Humboldt. So it makes sense to set a higher minimum wage in a pricey urban area.

 

Economic Inequality: It’s Far Worse Than You Think

Economic Inequality: It’s Far Worse Than You Think   

In a candid conversation with Frank Rich last fall, Chris Rock said, "Oh, people don’t even know. If poor people knew how rich rich people are, there would be riots in the streets." The findings of three studies, published over the last several years in Perspectives on Psychological Science, suggest that Rock is right. We have no idea how unequal our society has become

 

Friday, March 20, 2015

Inland Empire: Next 'big dog' in California economy?

Inland Empire: Next 'big dog' in California economy?
In Riverside and San Bernardino counties, the very factors that are hampering economic recovery in the rest of the state are fueling a growth spurt that's already among the fastest in California.

 

Mexican farmworkers strike over low wages, blocking harvest

 Mexican farmworkers strike over low wages, blocking harvest
The strike, which began Tuesday, has shut down schools and stores across the region and focused attention on alleged labor abuses at agribusinesses that export millions of tons of produce to the U.S. every year. Among those targeted are U.S.-based BerryMex, which grows strawberries and raspberries sold under the Driscoll label.

 

Thursday, March 19, 2015

See which California jobs require the longest hours

See which California jobs require the longest hours

More than 2.2 million Californians, or 20 percent of the state's full-time employees, work at least 50 hours a week, according to a Bee review of the latest U.S. Census data.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/#storylink=cpy

 

As Women Try Out For Armor Units, 'If You Can Hack It, You Can Hack It'

As Women Try Out For Armor Units, 'If You Can Hack It, You Can Hack It'
The Pentagon lifted the ban on women serving in the unforgiving world of ground combat — infantry, armor and artillery units — but gave the armed service's branches until January to ask for exemptions. Now the Marines and the Army are running the necessary tests to see what women soldiers can do. Dozens of female Marines are taking part in this experiment at the desert base at Twentynine Palms for the next month.

 

Job gains continue, so why are wages stubbornly stagnant?

Job gains continue, so why are wages stubbornly stagnant?

Image of Job gains continue, so why are wages stubbornly stagnant?

February’s labor report came in with stronger growth than expected, with 295,000 jobs added last month and the lowest unemployment rate since the 2008 financial crisis. But wage growth continues to lag, with hourly earning rising just one tenth of a percent. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez analyzes the numbers with Judy Woodruf

 

Why workers’ comp isn’t working for many who need it

Why workers’ comp isn’t working for many who need it

Image of Why workers’ comp isn’t working for many who need it

Workers’ compensation benefits have played a critical role in the American labor market by allowing businesses to pay for medical costs and wages if an employee is injured on the job. But a new investigation has found that more than 30 states have passed laws reducing these benefits. Judy Woodruff learns more about the impact from Michael Grabell of ProPublica and Howard Berkes of NPR

 

Why you shouldn’t expect wages to rise any time soon

Photo by Daniel Lai/Aurora via Getty Images.
For months, the thorn in the side of otherwise sunny jobs reports has been sluggish wage growth. As unemployment falls, wages are supposed to rise. Those expectations will likely play a role in the Fed’s policy deliberations this week. But in today’s Making Sen$e column, economist John Komlos argues that there’s still too much slack in the labor market for much growth

 

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Kentucky Right-To-Work Battle Shifts To Counties

Eleven Kentucky counties have passed local right-to-work laws since last year, including several along the Tennessee border, which is a right-to-work state.

 

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