Labor & Economic News Blog


Friday, January 29, 2016

Too poor to retire and too young to die: More of America's elderly are struggling to survive

Too poor to retire and too young to die: More of America's elderly are struggling to survive

 Nearly one-third of U.S. heads of households ages 55 and older have no pension or retirement savings and a median annual income of about $19,000.

 

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Improving Economic Security by Strengthening and Modernizing the Unemployment Insurance System.




Improving Economic Security by Strengthening and Modernizing the Unemployment Insurance System. 
 In this week's address, the President spoke about the steps we need to take to modernize our unemployment insurance system.  Our country has come a long way in the past seven years, with more than 14 million jobs created, and the unemployment rate cut in half.  But, as our economy continues to change, there are still steps we need to take to ensure all Americans have the security and opportunity they deserve.  In his address, the President laid out his plan to help more hardworking Americans get unemployment insurance, find a new job, and have some assurance that even if a new job pays less than their old one they will have some help paying the bills.  These ideas are part of the President’s broader belief that everybody who works hard deserves their fair shot and the chance to get ahead.

 

Monday, November 23, 2015

Electing to Ignore the Poorest of the Poor

Electing to Ignore the Poorest of the Poor

Selective government assistance programs have left behind the persistently poor, an issue that has not been addressed in the presidential election season.

 

Half of New Yorkers Say They Are Barely or Not Getting By, Poll Shows

Half of New Yorkers Say They Are Barely or Not Getting By, Poll Shows

The survey showed great differences in perceptions of the quality of life in the city’s five boroughs, but it found that economic anxiety was widespread.

 

Urban Charter Schools Often Succeed. Suburban Ones Often Don’t.

Urban Charter Schools Often Succeed. Suburban Ones Often Don’t.

Studies show the schools benefit poor, nonwhite students in cities, but in suburbs they do no better than public schools, and sometimes worse.

 

Rosy jobs numbers blind us to the bleak reality of the 'real economy'

Rosy jobs numbers blind us to the bleak reality of the 'real economy'


When you see news that unemployment in California has dipped to 5.8%, said Chris Hoene of the California Budget & Policy Center, it's not as rosy as it sounds. "There are more and more sectors in which people are being paid less than they were before … or they're having to work several jobs," said Hoene.

 

For Artfully ‘Worn’ Jeans, Technology Replaces Labor

For Artfully ‘Worn’ Jeans, Technology Replaces Labor 

 

Levi Strauss & Co.now uses an awful lot of design and technology to produce beat-up pants that command higher prices and margins. Technology is not only replacing ever-more-expensive labor but ever-more-busy consumers who don’t have the time to break in their jeans.

 

Robots Take on More-Elaborate Tasks

Robots Take on More-Elaborate Tasks

 In a former kitchen-cabinet workshop here, a dozen engineers are creating robots to sew garments and rugs—tasks usually relegated to low-wage workers in distant countries.

 

The Argument for a 70% Pay Raise for Women


The Argument for a 70% Pay Raise for Women

 

The left-leaning Economic Policy Institute finds a 71% “gender and inequality wage gap.

 

Mobility Is More Important Than Ever, and Here’s Who’s Missing Out

Mobility Is More Important Than Ever, and Here’s Who’s Missing Out

A new report shows that residential mobility has been largely stable in recent decades, but has declined for African-Americans, even as the link between moving and economic mobility grows stronger

 

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